House of Horrors: The Bramford in Rosemary’s Baby (1968)

This post is part of the Favorite Movie and TV Homes Blogathon, hosted by Phyllis Loves Classic Movies and Love Letters to Old Hollywood. Read more posts from this event HERE!

Setting is of primary importance in a horror film. Usually, we imagine a creepy mansion, or a graveyard, or the basement lair of a serial killer.

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The Jack Nicholson 80th Birthday Blogathon: Easy Rider (1969)

This post is part of the Here’s Jack!: The Jack Nicholson 80th Birthday Blogathon, hosted by Gill of Realweegiemidget Reviews. Read the rest of the posts in this event HERE!

“This is the longest music video ever,” commented my niece as we watched Easy Rider for this blogathon.

Well, yes. It’s impossible to escape the dated feeling of the film Easy Rider, with classic rock music commenting on the sound track as the two protagonists Billy (Peter Fonda) and Wyatt (Denise Hopper) ride their motorcycles through breathtaking American vistas. Hippies, people who hate hippies, drugs, communes, talk about being free of the “establishment,” of getting back to the land, of free love, etc., etc., etc.

The music remains to this day glorious. But I think it would be a mistake to dismiss Easy Rider as a relic belonging to a short moment in time.

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The April Showers Blogathon: The Rainmaker (1956)

This post is part of The April Showers Blogathon, hosted by Steve at MovieMovieBlogBlog. Read the rest of the posts in this even HERE!

I hadn’t seen the 1956 film The Rainmaker, starring Burt Lancaster and Katharine Hepburn, in quite a long time. In fact, I can tell you EXACTLY when I saw it last: the morning of 9/11. I worked from home at the time. That meant instead of sitting in traffic on a commute, I could watch movies on TCM before heading to my home office to start work.

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The Jack Lemmon Blogathon: Some Like It Hot (1959)

This post is part of the Jack Lemmon Blogathon, hosted by Le of Critica Retro and Rich of Wide Screen World. Read the rest of the posts in this event HERE!

Today, Some Like It Hot is considered one of the great classic comedies of all time. Based on an obscure French film about musicians out of work, Billy Wilder and his partner I.A.L. Diamond extracted one section of the story where they are forced to dress as women in order to get work.

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The Early Women Filmmakers Blogathon: Ida Lupino’s The Hitch-Hiker (1953)

This post is part of the Early Women Filmmakers Blogathon, hosted by Fritzi at Movies Silently. Read the rest of the posts in this event HERE!

I was so excited when Fritzi announced this blogathon. You see, I have a degree in film studies, which I earned back in the early 1980s. I studied at Queens College, which had a marvelous interdisciplinary program, with film classes available across many departments, not just the film department.

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The 90 Years of Sidney Poitier Blogathon: To Sir, with Love (1967)

This post is part of the 90 Years of Sidney Poitier Blogathon, hosted by Virginie at The Wonderful World of Cinema. Read the rest of the post in this event HERE!

The 1967 film To Sir, with Love was a popular British film of the 1960s, and it’s not hard to see why. It hit the screen at a moment of social upheaval, featured rebellious Baby Boomer teens, and had a strong British rock soundtrack (and top-40 theme song).

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Bogart’s Great Anti-Hero Role: The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948)

This post is part of the Humphrey Bogart 117th Birthday Blogathon, hosted by Sleepwalking in Hollywood and Musings of a Classic Film Addict. Read the rest of the posts in this event HERE!

Anti-heroes are a regular feature in film and television nowadays—but back in the 1940s, they were usually consigned to crime sub genres like film noir and gangster films. Outside of those genres, it was pretty rare to encounter a Hollywood star playing a blatantly unlikeable lead character.

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At the Circus Blogathon: Carnival of Souls (1962)

This post is part of the At the Circus Blogathon, hosted by Summer at Serendipitous Anachronisms and Le of Critica Retro. Please check out the hashtag #AttheCircus on Twitter to find more posts in this event!

The 1962 low-budget horror flick Carnival of Souls was consigned to obscurity, only appearing now and then on local TV stations after midnight, until 1989 when it was rescued by a film restorer and rereleased into theaters. Cited as an influence on filmmakers such as Wes Craven, George A. Romero, and David Lynch, it has achieved true cult status.

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