The Early Women Filmmakers Blogathon: Ida Lupino’s The Hitch-Hiker (1953)

This post is part of the Early Women Filmmakers Blogathon, hosted by Fritzi at Movies Silently. Read the rest of the posts in this event HERE!

I was so excited when Fritzi announced this blogathon. You see, I have a degree in film studies, which I earned back in the early 1980s. I studied at Queens College, which had a marvelous interdisciplinary program, with film classes available across many departments, not just the film department.

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Favourite TV Episode Blogathon: Blackadder – “Head”

This post is part of the 3rd Annual Favourite TV Episode Blogathon, hosted by Terry of A Shroud of Thoughts. Read the rest of the posts in this event HERE!

The British comedy series Blackadder (originally called “The Black Adder” during Season 1) is unique in many ways. While all center on a character named Edmund Blackadder (played by Rowan Atkinson), each season takes place during a different period of British history.

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The 90 Years of Sidney Poitier Blogathon: To Sir, with Love (1967)

This post is part of the 90 Years of Sidney Poitier Blogathon, hosted by Virginie at The Wonderful World of Cinema. Read the rest of the post in this event HERE!

The 1967 film To Sir, with Love was a popular British film of the 1960s, and it’s not hard to see why. It hit the screen at a moment of social upheaval, featured rebellious Baby Boomer teens, and had a strong British rock soundtrack (and top-40 theme song).

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Oscar’s Overlooked Film Score: The Piano by Michael Nyman

This post is part of the 31 Days of Oscar Blogathon, hosted by Aurora of Once Upon a Screen, Kellee of Outspoken & Freckled, and Paula of Paula’s Cinema Club. Read the rest of the posts in this event HERE!

This is the third year in a row I’ve written a post about an Oscar snub for this blogathon (previously: Preston Sturges’ snub in the director category and Alan Rickman’s total lack of Oscar nominations). In both those previous cases, I was able to suss out somewhat reasonable explanations for why those snubs occurred.

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O Canada! Blogathon: Gunless (2010)

This post is part of the 2017 O Canada! Blogathon, hosted by Kristina at Speakeasy and Ruth at Silver Screenings. Read the rest of the posts for this event HERE!

My love of Westerns expands to spoofs of the genre. Love Blazing Saddles, Support Your Local Sheriff, The Paleface, Maverick, Cat Ballou. Yes, I’ll even admit to a fondness for Shanghai Noon, and will further admit that I did not totally hate A Million Ways to Die in the West.

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Debbie’s Totally Random and Completely Insignificant Pop Culture Awards of 2016

Yay, awards time! As always, these are about my personal preferences and just for fun.

The Television Episode that Kicked the Ass of Anything in Movies Award:

The Battle of the Bastards, Game of Thrones

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Bogart’s Great Anti-Hero Role: The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948)

This post is part of the Humphrey Bogart 117th Birthday Blogathon, hosted by Sleepwalking in Hollywood and Musings of a Classic Film Addict. Read the rest of the posts in this event HERE!

Anti-heroes are a regular feature in film and television nowadays—but back in the 1940s, they were usually consigned to crime sub genres like film noir and gangster films. Outside of those genres, it was pretty rare to encounter a Hollywood star playing a blatantly unlikeable lead character.

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At the Circus Blogathon: Carnival of Souls (1962)

This post is part of the At the Circus Blogathon, hosted by Summer at Serendipitous Anachronisms and Le of Critica Retro. Please check out the hashtag #AttheCircus on Twitter to find more posts in this event!

The 1962 low-budget horror flick Carnival of Souls was consigned to obscurity, only appearing now and then on local TV stations after midnight, until 1989 when it was rescued by a film restorer and rereleased into theaters. Cited as an influence on filmmakers such as Wes Craven, George A. Romero, and David Lynch, it has achieved true cult status.

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The Agnes Moorehead Blogathon: Hush…Hush Sweet Charlotte

This post is part of the Agnes Moorehead Blogathon, hosted by Crystal at In the Good Old Days of Hollywood. Read the rest of the posts in this event HERE!

My first experience of Agnes Morehead’s talent was her role as Endora on the TV series Bewitched. In the show, she was always impeccably coiffed, made-up, and dressed. So it was a bit of a shock the first time I saw her as Velma in the 1964 movie Hush…Hush Sweet Charlotte.

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The Cary Grant Blogathon: Arsenic and Old Lace (1944)

This post is part of the Cary Grant Blogathon, hosted by Phyllis at Phyllis Loves Classic Movies. Read the rest of the posts in this event HERE!

There’s an argument to be made that dark comedy is one of, if not the, hardest genre to pull off successfully. While many are lauded (i.e. Dr. Strangelove, Kind Hearts and Coronets, much of the Coen Bros. oeuvre, etc.) most have their detractors, as well.

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